Disrecognized Space

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Sousveillance: a resistance by any other name

The nature of digital media makes surveillance increasingly pervasive and unavoidable. The connected nature of digital media increases the reach of surveillance both geographically and in terms of data accumulated. Sousveillance is a resistance to this which represents one of a number of ways that can combine to bring surveillance out into the open. This paper will initially explore the nature of digital surveillance and how it differs from previous forms of surveillance, including theoretical reinventions of the concept of the panopticon, before presenting sousveillance as a form of resistance in both theory and practice. Finally, the effectiveness of sousveillance as one of a number of resistant strategies will be evaluated. Continue reading
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New Media: Communications in the Electronic Age – Assignment One

Section 1: Essay questionThe nature of digital media makes surveillance increasingly pervasive and unavoidable. Assess in what ways sousveillance represents a response to digital surveillance. Is sousveillance an effective form of resistance to surveillance?

Section 2: Annotated bibliography

Braman, Sandra 2006, ‘Tactical memory: The politics of openness in the construction of memory’, First Monday, vol. 11, No. 7 (July 2006), viewed 12 June 2012,
Braman provides a theoretical discussion of the “openness movement” and its push for democratic availability of information and its relationship to tactical and political memory (strangely though, the “openness movement” itself remains ill-defined by her).

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